Website Colour : Using Colour to Maximise Interaction on Your Website

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Why Colour matters


When using colour to maximise interaction on your website, you need to consider a number of specifics.

  1. Does your company and brand have a particular colour you want to maintain throughout your website.
  2. Does the product you are promoting have a certain colour.
  3. Will your website have a theme associated with a colour or environment
  4. Do you have certain calls to action (CTA) buttons that require a colour to encourage clients to click on them, and how does that colour fit your theme colour.

Choice of theme colour


The main colour of your  theme, promotes a feeling and desire when a client lands on your website.
Leading web designers and online brands repeatedly use certain colours to portray a certain feeling. These colours encourage the visitor to interact with your pages and hopefully take the desired action.

The info-graphic here provides some examples of key colours and the feeling they betray.

 

 

Website Colour Pallets


There are some great tools out there for helping you chose an underlying colour pallet and theme. Best practice however, is to stick to a minimal number of colours and use them through your site, remaining consistent on how you use them.

It’s just as important to define how your website looks from a colour perspective as it is to the content and wording. After all what’s the point of someone coming to your site and not taking any action, or being turned off by the colours.

A very useful site that helps you create a pallet, and if you get stuck, automatically generates one, along with the hex codes, is coolors.co

 

Example colour pallet

 

Whilst on the subject of “call to action”, one of the most important considerations therefore is the specific colour of the CTA button. Again the whole purpose for attracting someone to your site is for them to download, submit a form, subscribe or buy a product.

Extensive research has been made on analysing interactive behavior, based on colour. You need go no further than looking at leading online brands to see how they use colour.

 

The 3 best colors for call to action buttons


1. Red. The colour red stands out on most web pages. It invokes passion, excitement, and a sense of urgency. If you want your clients to take urgent action on your product or services, (i.e. purchase it, download or subscribe) then Red is the right colour. Funny enough, many people think that Red usually is associated with stop, but studies show it is one of the best colours to catch attention and use for call to action button.

2. Green. If the product or service you are selling relates to the environment, psychology, and peace, then green is the right call to action button colour for you. Green is calming and peaceful, and can be associated with “Go” which is a motivator for many customers. It may be mentally easier for your clients to click on a green button rather than any other colour.

3. Orange or Yellow. Orange provides an exciting and warm feeling. Most people will associate it with warmth from the sun or a nice open fire. This warmth in turn leads to individuals taking action. When clients feel happy, they will be more likely to buy products that they associate with happiness. As an example, look at Amazon, their entire site is painted with the color yellow and orange. It works for them, and they do massive amounts of website optimisation testing and analysis, so there’s a lot of evidence to suggest that it will work for your website too.

 

Example Call to Action Buttons

Summary


Take a look at how leading brands use colour, the use of the call to action, and the contrasting colours making up their pallets.

Try different combinations of colors, different shades and shapes of buttons. The great thing is, there is no one answer or solution that works, so for your specific website, take the time to experiment. Utilise your friends or user groups to see what they think and what colours would make them take action.

Some examples of how we have used colour and calls to action buttons HERE

 

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